Frequently Asked Questions

What is Nutrifix?

The first nutrition app to locate healthy meals nearby - whether you’re eating in, out or having it delivered - tailored to your body’s nutritional needs.

How does the Nutrifix app work?

Taking your age, height, weight and health goals, Nutrifix calculates the best food nearby to meet your nutritional needs.

Using a clever algorithm, every meal in the vicinity - from takeaways to restaurants - is given a Nutrifix Score, unique to you. The higher the score the better it is for you.

Click ‘route’ and you’ll be guided to your meal using your phone’s GPS. Or, swipe right, and have it delivered through our exclusive partnership with Deliveroo.

Think of us as your own personal nutritionist on the go.

What is the Nutrifix score?

The Nutrifix Score is the best way of finding the perfect healthy meal to match your nutritional needs.

We take the information you provide us (age, weight, height, health goals) combined with the nutritional information from thousands of food vendors, plus approved and checked nutritional guidelines on things like fibre, sugar, sat fats and salt, to generate a score for every meal unique to you.

The higher the score out of 100 the better matched that meal is to your body’s nutritional needs.

So how do you calculate the daily nutritional needs?

We start by calculating your BMR (Basal Metabolic Rate) using the gold standard equation calculation. This takes into account body weight, height, age and sex to determine the number of calories you will use day-to-day simply being alive.

Then we use the Harris Benedict Equation, which takes this BMR and applies an activity factor to determine an individual’s total daily energy expenditure (calories).

If that all sounds complicated it’s because it is. But don’t worry Nutrifix does all the hard work for you, telling you what matters most: the healthiest meal to eat.

What is the BMR formula?

This method has been approved by the American College of Sports Medicine and is considered the most accurate way to determine daily calorie requirements.

Women: BMR = 655 + (9.6 x weight in kilos) + (1.8 x height in cm) - (4.7 x age in years)

Men: BMR = 66 + (13.7 x weight in kilos) + (5 x height in cm) - (6.8 x age in years)

What is The Harris Benedict equation?

Sedentary (little or no exercise): Recommended calorie intake = BMR x 1.2

Lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week): Recommended calorie intake = BMR x 1.375

Moderately active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week): Recommended calorie intake = BMR x 1.55

Very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week): Recommended calorie intake = BMR x 1.725

Extremely active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training): Recommended calorie intake = BMR x 1.9

What if I want to lose weight?

For weight loss, it’s well established that a calorie deficit of 500 calories each day will result in an average of around 1lb each week (1), or just under a half a kilo.

For weight gain, it’s been shown that by consuming an extra 500 calories each day you will gain around 1lb each week. Therefore, this is reflected in our calorie calculations based on the user’s weight goals.

How do you determine my macronutrient recommendations?

Carbohydrate, protein and fat are the three macronutrients that are all essential for good health and contribute significantly to the energy intake of an individual. We recommend specific amounts of these three macronutrients as percentages of total energy intake.

Our standard recommendation is for carbohydrate to contribute 45%, protein 25% and fat 30%.

This is in line with Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (2).

Shouldn’t I just cut carbohydrates from my diet to lose weight?

Many studies have shown that a higher protein intake and a lower carbohydrate intake can be beneficial for weight loss, while maintaining lean muscle mass. This may be due to protein’s satiation effects (3,4).

Protein intake at higher than the national recommended levels (0.75g per kg bodyweight) has also been shown to produce beneficial results on chronic diseases such as obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, heart disease, and sarcopenia. (5,6,7,8)

However, we will advise that individuals do not decrease carbohydrate intake to less than 40% to ensure that the recommended daily fibre intake of 30g is still met, along with the required micronutrient needs (9).

And remember, you should always consult your doctor before making significant changes to your diet.

Where can I use Nutrifix?

You’ll find over 80 vendors at 10,000 plus locations across the UK on the Nutrifix app, and we are rapidly growing. Want to find healthy food in your city - then please do contact us!

I sell healthy food how do I get involved?

First of all, thumbs up to that. Please get in contact as we would love to have you on board.

References

  1. British Nutrition Foundation. Healthy Weight Loss
  2. https://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/healthissues/healthy-weight-loss.html
  3. Institute of Medicine. Panel on Macronutrients, Panel on the Definition of Dietary Fiber, Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients, Subcommittee on Interpretation and Uses of Dietary Reference Intakes, and the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes Food and Nutrition Board. 2005. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16004827
  4. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016 Mar;103(3):738-46.Higher compared with lower dietary protein during an energy deficit combined with intense exercise promotes greater lean mass gain and fat mass loss: a randomized trial. Longland TM et al.
  5. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006;83:260–274. Effects of variation in protein and carbohydrate intake on body mass and composition during energy restriction: a meta-regression 1. Krieger JW et al.
  6. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;87:1558S–1561S. Protein, weight management, and satiety. Paddon-Jones D et al.
  7. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;87:1562S–1566S. Role of dietary protein in the sarcopenia of aging. Paddon-Jones D et al.
  8. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;87:1567S–1570S Amount and type of protein influences bone health. Heaney RP & Layman DK.
  9. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;87:1571S–1575S. Protein in optimal health: heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Layman DK et al.
  10. Institute of Medicine; Food and Nutrition Board; A Report of the Panel on Macronutrients; Subcommittees on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients and Interpretation and Uses of Dietary Reference Intakes; Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2002.